Nathan & Katie surprise engagement

 Nathan & Katie surprise engagement

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Nathan & Katie surprise engagement

Nathan & Katie surprise engagement

Nathan & Katie surprise engagement

Nathan & Katie surprise engagement

Nathan & Katie surprise engagement

A Testimonial-“Charles was fantastic to work with through out the entire process of trying to work out a surprise engagement at Niagara Falls. He helped out with the planning, as well as the location, which was incredibly useful considering I’d never visited the Falls before. I had some trouble trying to coax my girlfriend (now fiance!) into getting to the planned location on time. Despite the fact we showed up 45 minutes late, Charles had waited outside for us in the cold/snow/rain to catch the moment I proposed. We can’t thank him enough for sticking with us and being so courteous despite everything! That is the type of dedication that Charles puts into his craft and it definitely shows in our pictures. They came out amazing and I can’t recommend him highly enough! 10 out of 5 Stars for Baldini and Vandersluys Photographers!”
Nathan & Katie

All images were taken at Oakes Gardens in Niagara Falls, Ontario


1800 393-7270 http://bvphotog.com

#NiagaraFallsengagment #ElopeNiagaraFalls


1800 393-7270 

#NiagaraFallsengagment #ElopeNiagaraFalls

CFL Players’ Association

CFL Players’ Association

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CFL Players’ Association

CFL Players’ Association

CFL Players’ Association

CFL Players’ Association

CFL Players’ Association

CFL Players’s Association – Baldini Vandersluys was there to photograph when the CFLPA Announced the New Executive TeamNiagara Falls – Baldini Vandersluys was there to photograph when the CFLPA Announced the New Executive Team Niagara Falls – The Player Representatives of the Canadian Football League Players’ Association met at their 2018 Annual General Meeting and elected their 2018-2019 Executive Committee. We are proud to announce that incumbent Jeff Keeping has been re-elected as President of the Canadian Football League Players Assn. 1st Vice-President Marwan Hage was elected to remain in his role as 1st VP. There are two new members voted to the Executive with the addition of BC Lions’ Solomon Elimimian as the 2nd Vice President, and Rolly Lumbala as the 3rd Vice President. Peter Dyakowski of the Saskatchewan Roughriders has also been re-elected as Treasurer of the CFLPA. The Player Representatives and the CFLPA Executive Committee would like to acknowledge and thank both Keon Raymond and Josh Bourke for their years of dedicated service.

1.800.393.7270 for a quote for your next event

 

Benoit Huot Canadian Paralympic Gold Metal Winner

Benoit Huot Canadian Paralympic Gold Metal Winner

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Benoit Huot Canadian Paralympic Gold Metal Winner

Benoit Huot Canadian Paralympic Gold Metal Winner

Benoit Huot Canadian Paralympic Gold Metal Winner

Me holding an Olympic Gold Medal this morning with Benoit Huot.
Being in the Business that we are in, I get to meet and hear some amazing Key Note Speakers. This who I meet today. What a great person, a inspiration, and a real nice guy.
Benoit Huot is a Canadian Paralympic swimmer, who has won nine Paralympic Games gold medals for Canada, primarily in the freestyle and butterfly strokes.
Hailing from Longueuil, Quebec, Huot was born with club feet, started swimming competitively at age 10 at the CAMO Natation club, where he is trained by Benoit Lebrun. In the beginning he competed alongside able-bodied swimmers and competed at two Quebec Games, earning silver in 1997.
Benoit Huot made his international debut in 1998 as a member of Canada’s team at the International Paralympic Committee world championships, where he won two gold and four silver medals. He added three more gold and three silver medals at the 2000 Paralympics and eight medals at the 2002 IPC Swimming World Championships.
In 2003, Huot was named the male athlete of the year with a disability by the International Commonwealth Federation.
In 2004, Huot grabbed five gold medals, one silver medal and three world records at the 2004 Paralympic Games in Athens.
In 2005, Huot won six golds at the Disability Sport England Swimming Championships. He then went on to take a gold and a silver at the inaugural Paralympic World Cup in Manchester in events that were swum just 15 minutes apart. This led the Swimming World Magazine to award him the World Disabled Swimmer of the Year award.
At the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London he won gold, silver, and bronze medals, giving him a total of 19 medals in four Paralympic Game. He was named Canada’s flag bearer for the Games closing ceremony.
Huot has served on the athletes’ council with Swimming Canada, the Canadian Paralympic Committee and Commonwealth Games Federation

If you would like more info about our services please call toll free 1800 393-7270

The Mighty Niagara

The Mighty Niagara

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The Mighty Niagara

The Mighty Niagara

The Mighty Niagara

The Mighty Niagara

The Mighty Niagara

The Mighty Niagara

The Mighty Niagara

The Mighty Niagara

The Mighty Niagara Winter of 2018-Went down to the Falls this morning. It was a lot warmer than last weekend. Not too many people around. Windy though, but that made for some great images of the water. It was also a nice sunrise. What do you think? Love to hear your comments on your favourite images.

One of the seven natural wonders of the world. There is a spot you can stand where it feels like you can reach out and touch the water as it goes over the falls. It is mesmerising. This vantage point requires no admission, no tour guides, no special access, no time constraints…it is open 24/7 7 days a week, ALL year round. You simply can stand a few feet from Niagara Falls and enjoy the wonder.

The Mighty Niagara

The first humans arrived in Niagara Region almost 12,000 years ago, just in time to witness the birth of the Falls. The land was different then, consisting of tundra and spruce forest. During this time (the Palaeo-Indian Period, which lasted until 9,000 years ago), Niagara was inhabited by the Clovis people. These nomadic hunters likely camped along the old Lake Erie shoreline, living in simple, tiny dwellings. They left little to mark their tenure except chipped stones. These large, fluted projectile points were likely to fell the caribou, mastodons, moose and elk that roamed the land.

By 9,500 years ago a deciduous forest apparently covered southernmost Ontario. This forest supported the hunter-gatherers of the Archaic Period (9,000 to 3,000 years ago) with a diet of deer, moose, fish and plants. Small groups hunted in the winter, feeding on nuts and animals attracted to the forest. Larger groups came together during the summer, setting up fishing camps at the mouths of rivers and along lakeshores.

The Woodland Period lasted from 3,000 to 300 years ago, culminating in the peak of Iroquois culture in southern Ontario. Corn, bean and squash agriculture provided the main sources of food. With their bellies full, the Iroquois had time for other pursuits and the population boomed. Small palisaded villages were built, with nuclear or extended families occupying individual longhouses. During this period, burial rituals and ceramics were introduced to Ontario. Society became more complex with a political system based on extended kinship and inter-village alliances.

When the European explorers and missionaries arrived at the beginning of the 17th Century, the Iroquoian villages were under the direction of various chiefs elected from the major clans. In turn, these villages were allied within powerful tribal confederacies.

Unfortunately, inter-tribal warfare with the Five Nations Iroquois of New York State, made worse by the intrusion of the Europeans, dispersed the three Ontario confederacies, the Huronthe Petun and the NeutralNiagara ceased to be the territory of those who lived in harmony with nature. Still, this fascinating period of native occupation cries out for interpretation and study. Since human settlement requires drinking water, sites within 150 metres of rivers and lakeshores have the greatest archaeological potential. Palaeo-Indian sites in Niagara would most likely be associated with the series of relic beach ridges that once formed the shore of early Lake Erie.

In May 1535, Jacques Cartier left France to explore the New World. Although he never saw Niagara Falls, the Indians he met along the St.Lawrence River told him about it. Samuel de Champlain visited Canada in 1608. He, too, heard stories of the mighty cataract, but never visited it. Etienne Brule, the first European to see Lakes Ontario, Erie Huron and Superior, may also have been the first to behold the Falls, in 1615.

That same year, the Recollet missionary explorers arrived in Ontario. They were followed a decade later by the Jesuits. It was a Jesuit father, Gabriel Lalemant, who first recorded the Iroquios name for the river- Onguiaahra, meaning “the Strait”. “Niagara” is a simplification of the original.

In 1651, during the fur- trade rivalry between the Huron and Iroquois that was first precipitated by the French, the Iroquois wiped out the Neutrals. Until the American Revolution, they managed to keep white settlers out of Niagara almost completely.

In December 1678, Recollet priest Louis Hennepin visited Niagara Falls. Nineteen years later, he published the first engraving of the Falls in his book Nouvelle Decouverte. The Falls obviously made a great impression of Hennepin, for he estimated their height to be 183 metres, more than three times what it really is.

In 1812, by request of President James Madison, the United States congress declared war on Canada. Artifacts from that war dot the riverside, as do monuments erected later, such as the one to Sir Isaac Brock. Recently, the skeletons of members of the U.S. Army were found near Old Fort Erie.

Following the War of 1812, the region began the slow process of rebuilding itself. Queenston became a bustling community, but Chippawa was the big centre, with distilleries and factories.

In the 1820’s, a stairway was built down the bank at Table Rock and the first ferry service across the lower River began. By 1827, a paved road had been built up from the ferry landing to the top of the bank on the Canadian side. This site became the prime location for hotel development and the Clifton was built there, after which Clifton Hill is named.

Niagara has perhaps the most complex transportation history of any area in North America. The first Welland Canal was completed in 1829. Between 1849 and 1962, thirteen bridges were constructed across the Niagara River Gorge. Four of them remain.

The roadway between Niagara-on-the-Lake and Chippawa was the first designated King’s Highway. The first stage coach in Upper Canadaoperated on this roadway between the late 1700s and 1896. The first railroad in Upper Canada opened in 1841 with horse-drawn carriages running between Chippawa and Queenston. In 1854 it was converted to steam and relocated to serve what was to become the Town of Niagara Falls.

In 1855, John August Roebling, the designer of the Brooklyn Bridge, built the Niagara Railway Suspension Bridge, the first bridge of its type in the world. Between the late 1700s and the middle 1800s, boats were the main way to get to Niagara Falls. By 1896, three boats plied the route between Toronto and Queenston.

One of the first electrified street car services was provided in Niagara, and in 1893 the Queenston/Chippawa Railway carried boat passengers from Queenston to Table Rock and beyond. In 1902, a railway was constructed across the Queenston Suspension Bridge. Later it was extended along the lower Gorge on the American side of the River, connecting back into Canada at the Upper Arch Bridge. This transit line, the Great Gorge Route, continued in service until the Depression. The use of boats declined as tourists increasingly chose to visit Niagara by automobile, bus or train.

Tourism travel to the Falls began in the 1820s and within 50 years it had increased ten-fold to become the area’s dominant industry.

After World War 1, automobile touring became popular. As a response, attractions and accommodations sprang up in strip developments, much of which still survives.

#NiagaraFalls #FrozenNiagaraFalls #exploreCanada #ExploreNiagara#NiagaraFallsfrozen #frozenfalls  #Nikon 

#NiagaraFallsphotographer#Niagarawinterwonderland #winterwonderland

#LundysLaneNF#TopPhotographersNiagaraFalls #BaldiniVandersluysPhotographers

All images by Baldini Vandersluys photographers 1800 393-7270


 


 

Corporate Event Photographers Niagara

Corporate Event Photographers Niagara

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Corporate Event Photographers Niagara

Corporate Event Photographers Niagara

Corporate Event Photographers Niagara

Corporate Event Photographers Niagara

Corporate Event Photographers Niagara

Corporate Event Photographers Niagara Falls- this is the 7th year that we have photographed Pool and Hot Tub Council of Canada  at the Scotiabank Convention Centre in Niagara Falls, Ontario.

The Pool & Hot Tub Council of Canada is an association representing the interests of the top companies that make up the pool and spa industry in Canada.

Abiding by the Code of Ethics, member companies perform to the highest standards of workmanship and service.

The Pool & Hot Tub Council of Canada is a national, not-for-profit association of companies, organizations and individuals involved in the aquatic leisure industry.

Members include builders, contractors, retailers, service providers, manufacturers and distributors of swimming pools, hot tubs and water feature products.

Members also include public pool operators and related safety organizations.

Our members promote the safe enjoyment of pools and hot tubs by sharing their knowledge with others.

We encourage only the highest standards of quality and professionalism so that all Canadians can take pleasure from our products and services.

Corporate Event Photographers Niagara

With over 35 years of experience Baldini  Vandersluys Photographers,  can provide your event with copyright and all the images edited and timely turn around.

Contact us Toll Free at 1 800 393-7270 for a free quote and more information on how we can help take some of the worry away in booking your event.

#CorporateEvent  #NiagaraFalls  #Convention

 

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